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SAMARIA W.A.M.CHURCH

Samaria has got the well tested and proven date of 1844. There is however, a date 1799 attributed to its founding because there was an alleged Congregation referred to as “African”, consisting of purely Africans with a Revd. Ede Nylander leading those recaptives. Between 1792 and 1800 there were only indigenous people and “settlers” in the settlement. The liberated Africans only started settling in Freetown from 1808. All the other factors given about this “African” Congregation point more or less to the “Maroons” of 1800 (not 1799), who built the St. John’s Maroon Church within a proximity nearest the Museum location of Siaka Stevens Street, which is cited by the Samaria Church exponents as their landmark, and is claimed for the Samaria origin; and the 1808 date of St. John’s Maroon appears much likely as the other conjectural basis given, as evident of the earlier than 1844 historical establishment of the Samaria Church. Unfortunately history cannot thrive for long on conjectures, but on facts. It may be conclusively proved that the reference to the 1799 history as the founding date of Samaria is based on unquestionable authentically attested documents that are yet to be produced, to silence all speculations, and objections.

Taking into consideration the aims and objectives of the League, if continues to support ambitious but less privileged school going children of our society. It continues to participate in several developmental activities of the society, such as the re-electrification of the church during the reconstruction of the church’s concrete gallery.

The League recently gave a helping hand to a sister society, the Johnson Memorial W.A.M. Church, at Bassa Town, Waterloo, which included the construction of a steel front door and windows for the whole church and participated in the unveiling and rededication ceremony at a church service held on Sunday 8th June, 2008

Finally the League spare-headed another major project of this society as part of our Golden Jubilee celebrations in 2009.

Wanderer

The Samaria West African Methodist Church Choir is an all-male voice choir with a traditional and classical Christian musical pedigree. The choir goes back to the early days of the founding of the Church but earliest records on hand dates around the 1940s. The choir is divided into four musical tones; Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Bass. Renditions from the major musical maestros are commonplace with regular anthems and compositions rendered at periodic celebrations of the church. The Samaria West African Methodist Church has for a long time been recognized as the Cathedral of the West African Methodist Connexion and hence the Choir holds a prominent place in the choral ministry of the denomination. Notable choirmasters include Jonathan Adjaie Thomas, Festus B. Harding, Prof. Nathaniel Thomas Claudius George, Cobina E.J. Dravie-Dixon, Samuel Koffie-Williams, George Spilsbury Williams, Kenneth Mario Gray. The choir’s annual festival falls on Whit Sunday every year and this is celebrated with songs and choral music including classical renditions of works of great masters and special settings to hymns and psalms. Renditions have come from Mendelssohn, Handel, Bach, Mozart, Hoyden etc. The choir also performs works from contemporary writers such as Claude Bhamee Davies, Aubrey Nat Jones, Samuel Koffie-Williams, etc. Psalms in Krio and other works in other languages form part of the celebratory repertoire at Christmas and the choir festival service. Samaria West African Methodist Church Choir currently consist of an average strength of forty men and boys. The choir is fully traditional in outlook and is robed every Sunday during the Church’s calendar.

Wanderer
A cross section of Samaria Choir

The present iron gates leading to the porch was donated by the Samaria Women’s Progressive Group and the metal and glass arch over the main church door was donated by members of the Samaria Women’s Christian Association. The main metal door leading into the chapel was donated by a family of Samaria congregation who wishes to remain anonymous.

The choir undertook a self help project to reconstruct and extend the church’s choir stall in 1999, the reconstructed stall being unveiled and dedicated on Sunday 6th February 2000. The preacher on the occasion was the General Superintendent Rev. J.O.M. Pratt.

You simply cannot keep the Samarians from being on the move. The next project tackled was to visit the gallery structure once again after its construction in the late 1830’s and dedication in 1844. The demolition and reconstruction from wood to concrete commenced on Monday 26th July 2004. During the period of reconstruction, church services were held in the St. John Maroon Methodist Church, whose congregation had graciously offered temporary facilities for such services.

Wanderer
Wanderer

The newly constructed concrete gallery and entire Church structure was re-opened and dedicated to God’s Glory on Sunday 6th February 2005. Preacher was Rev. H.A. Samuels, Circuit Superintendent, North Circuit.
The Samarians it appears cannot resist getting improvement done in our chapel. Does this urge run in our genes, inherited from our predecessors? I have raised this observation because, the society is currently undertaking another project-converting the fast deteriorating window iron frames of the chapel to aluminium and fixing guard bars to the windows.

Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur

Our attention has been drawn to the dampness being experienced on the church’s south wall due to the fact that the building stands on the bed of a dried-up stream which ran in the vicinity. There is a tendency for the water level to rise during the rainy season resulting in damp which causes paint to come off the wall. Experts have advised that the walls can be covered with tiles, and this project will be “hot on the heels” of the window project. With all these achievements it is indeed a fact that all praise and glory must be given to our Almighty God for the inspiration given to the stout-hearted men and women who gave themselves by taking up the challenge and rallying to the call. May the Almighty continue to bless them all..

We would be remiss if we fail to acknowledge the role of non-members of Samaria who gave support to each of the projects for which they were approached to render assistance. Coincidentally we find out that such individuals were putting into practice the current theme of the West African Methodist Church – “Sharing Prosperity in Common”.

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Samaria W.A.M. Church Choir

The Samaria West African Methodist Church Choir is an all-male voice choir with a traditional and classical Christian musical pedigree. The choir goes back to the early days of the founding of the Church but earliest records on hand dates around the 1940s

Samaria W.A M. Church choir

The Samaria West African Methodist Church Choir is an all-male voice choir with a traditional and classical Christian musical pedigree. The choir goes back to the early days of the founding of the Church but earliest records on hand dates around the 1940s. The choir is divided into four musical tones; Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Bass. Renditions from the major musical maestros are commonplace with regular anthems and compositions rendered at periodic celebrations of the church

The Samaria West African Methodist Church has for a long time been recognized as the Cathedral of the West African Methodist Connexion and hence the Choir holds a prominent place in the choral ministry of the denomination. Notable choirmasters include Jonathan Adjaie Thomas, Festus B. Harding, Prof. Nathaniel Thomas Claudius George, Cobina E.J. Dravie-Dixon, Samuel Koffie-Williams, George Spilsbury Williams, Kenneth Mario Gray.

The choir’s annual festival falls on Whit Sunday every year and this is celebrated with songs and choral music including classical renditions of works of great masters and special settings to hymns and psalms. Renditions have come from Mendelssohn, Handel, Bach, Mozart, Hoyden etc. The choir also performs works from contemporary writers such as Claude Bhamee Davies, Aubrey Nat Jones, Samuel Koffie-Williams, etc. Psalms in Krio and other works in other languages form part of the celebratory repertoire at Christmas and the choir festival service.
Samaria West African Methodist Church Choir currently consist of an average strength of forty men and boys. The choir is fully traditional in outlook and is robed every Sunday during the Church’s calendar.

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